Collapse

SearchPrint Electronic Fuel Conversion 94.5-97 OBS F250/F350 7.3L PowerStroke Diesel


Electronic Fuel Conversion 94.5-97 OBS F250/F350 7.3L PowerStroke Diesel
Date Added: 7/26/2013
Updated: 20190727211928
Posted by:
 Patrick

Author/Source:
Patrick

Viewed: 1556 times

After having a fuel leak for the past 3 months that has gotten much worse over the last 2 weeks to the point where I could see fuel coming out of the fuel pump, I was forced to do something.  I had been reading for months about conversions and after much consideration I decided that to go with the e-fuel conversion.  There are several ways to go about refitting your trucks fuel delivery.  This isn't a hard project, it's annoying having to get to the places you need to access the fuel line fittings.  I read most people had to remove their turbo to get the fuel pump off, this wasn't the case for me.  Do not try this conversion if you are pressured for time or this is your primary vehicle, while alot of ideas sound good in theory not all work out that way, plan to have atleast $450 but if you want to do a good solid job then plan on parting with atleast $700


Step by step conversion PART 1

Step by step conversion PART 2

Overview of 1st conversion

Thoughts about fuel pumps
 


EFuel Conversion of 2000 F350

EFuel Conversion of 2000 F350 part 2

Parts List
Bosch .044 Fuel Pump (DO NOT GO CHEAP HERE) or atleast goto a junk yard and get a fuel pump from a SD.
Aeromotive 13109 A1000-6 Injected Bypass Regulator $150 - Amazon
Raco/Parker water-fuel seperator 30micron $65 - Ebay
Strictly Diesel Filter Base (After trial and error do NOT use NAPA bases for your post filter, the pressure may be too high, this is the only one I found that does not leak.)
Wix 3770 Fuel Filter 10micron  $10 - Ebay
Aeroquip FCV0620 Hose AQP Socketless Rubber Blue -6 AN 20 ft $65 - Ebay
1x 3/8" NPT to 3/8" barb  $5.95 - Ebay
3x 1/2" NPT to AN6  $10.47 - Ebay
2x AN6 to 1/8 NPT straight $8.40 - Ebay
1x AN6 to 1/8 NPT 45 degree $4.95 - Amazon
1x AN6 to 1/8 NPT 90 degree $6.99 - Ebay
1x AN6 3 way Y block $9.98  - Ebay
3x ORB 6 to AN6 fittings $24.96 - Ebay
3x AN6 45degree Fittings $21 - Ebay
2x AN6 90degree Fittings $11.20 - Ebay
7/8" freeze plug $0.98 - local Advanced Auto Parts
Glow Shift fuel pressure gauge  $30 - Ebay
1x AN4male to AN6female Adapter
1x AN4 flare nut and sleeve
Fuel injector line clamps
So you can build your own kit for around $500-600, it just depends on how hard you shop and what kind of deals you can find on ebay.
I did buy more fittings than I needed and once I got everything made a few changes to my plan so I actually have a few more bucks into this than listed, but these are all the parts I actually used for the conversion.

Getting Started
Before getting started make sure to disconnect your batteries, you will be working around the Glow Plug relay (I should take my own advice).
Remove the turbo Y-pipe, just loosen the hose clamps on the boots and wiggle off, DO NOT PRY WITH A SCREWDRIVER.
Drain fuel from fuel bowl and catch with a drip pan.

Fuel Bowl Removal
Use a flat head screw driver and loosen all the hose clamps on the fuel lines on the fuel bowl as well as the fuel pump.
Cut all the rubber lines from the pump to bowl.
Use a 9/16" wrench to remove the return fuel lines that goto the fuel pressure regulator.
Use a 13mm socket and extension to remove the 2 bolts holding down the bowl and wiggle it out of there.
Disconnect the wires (some may already be burned into like mine) from the bowl and discard the piece of junk, or sell it if it is in good shape.

Fuel Pump Removal
Some people have to remove the turbo to get remove the fuel pump.
Remove rubber fuel lines (cutting them is easiest).
Remove the large banjo bolt on back of pump with a 1 1/4" wrench (I've read some people had to heat and bend theirs, however I did not).
Remove the 2 bolts that hold down the pump with a 10mm socket and extension.
VERY CAREFULLY wiggle the pump out, do not use too much force else the pump will snap off in your engine block and really make your project interesting.
BE CAREFUL that the tappet does not fall down into your engine, that would be a very serious problem.
Use a 7/8" freeze plug to cover the stock mechanical pump hole.
If you are going to reuse the old metal fuel lines that run to the back of heads then skip this step, some people may need to remove the turbo for this part, however I did not.  If you are going to reuse the old fuel lines and banjo bolt, look on ebay for a banjo block, OR what I was going to do is get fitting to size it from 3/4" to 3/8".
Remove the down pipe from turbo (this is MUCH easier if you have already upgraded from the stocker, if not well have fun)
Use a 9/16" wrench to remove the fuel lines, just be patient and take your time.
Remove stock fittings from head, there is 1 on the passenger side 9/16" socket wrench can get to it easy enough, but there are 2 that must come off the driver side, I used a crescent wrench to get at the fittings.
Do you best to try not to get debris into the fuel ports, the injectors won't be happy about it.

Power Steering Pump Bracket Removal
●Use a 13mm socket and remove the 4 bolts the hold the bracket and accessories off.
●Just push the AC, PS, and bracket a little to the right so you can get to the fuel fitting on the head.
●Use a 9/16" wrench to remove the stock fuel line from the head.
●Remove the stock fitting from the head and replace with a straight 1/8" to AN6 fitting.
I also took this time to replace my leaking PS pump and hoses as my PS pump had sucked a plastic bag into the pulley and was leaking.

Install Fittings into heads (PAY ATTENTION TO REAR DRIVER SIDE).
Do you best to try not to get debris into the fuel ports, the injectors won't be happy about it.
●Front driver side you must use a straight 1/8" NPT to AN6 fitting.
●Rear driver side you should use a 45 degree 1/8" NPT to AN6 fitting, HOWEVER you likely have a 90degree fitting that you will not be able to remove without removing the turbo up pipe, cut the fitting, OR do what I did I build a custom fitting from the OEM line.  (I do NOT recommend cutting fitting).  I used the stock 1/4" fuel line and put a AN4 and flare on it then a AN 4 to AN6 adapter.  I also have a 94 7.3 and it did not have this issue.
●Front passenger side you must use a 90 degree 1/8" NPT to AN6 fitting.
●Rear passenger side I used a straight 1/8" NPT to AN6 fitting.
I advise the use of teflon thread tape or thread dope on your fittings, and remember the fittings are not lug nuts so don't do like I did and strip one out.

Install Fuel Pressure Regulator (FPR).
First you need to take a good deal of time and plan out where you want your FPR, mine hugs the turbo Y pipe and I should have mounted it elsewhere and I will move it eventually.
I bought a fuel pressure gauge and I installed the sensor on the 1/8" port on the FRP
●Install the 3x ORB sittings on the Fuel Pressure Regulator.
●Connect the hoses from the front of the head to the side ports on the FPR and then connect the bottom port to the return line to the fuel tank.  I used the factory return line, I just used 2 fuel injection clamps on the hose.
●Finish mounting your FPR to your FPR bracket, in my case I bought a fuel pressure sensor and
I made my own bracket out of a piece of steel and bolted it to the glow plug relay bracket, it is a very tight fit, and I will likely move my FPR, if/when I do I will update.
You MUST have some kind of gauge to see what fuel pressure you are getting because this FPR has a manual adjustment screw that you will have to set for your application, I've read the 7.3's like 60-65psi, I set mine at 65psi.

Install Fuel Filters and Fuel Pump.
First you will need to lay under your truck and plan carefully, and you will also likely need to make yourself some kind of brackets to hold your filters and pump.
I screwed my fuel pump directly into the port on the pre-filter/water separator and bolted that assembly to a frame cross member.
Then I took some angle iron and made a bracket for the NAPA post filter and bolted that to the frame cross member, I really did not want to drill into the frame rail since my truck doesn't have any rust under it.
I cut the stock fuel hose from the hard line that comes from the tank switch and connected that to the in port on the fuel/water separator.
Then connect that post filter to the pump.
I did not reuse the factory steel feed line, I ran all new rubber hose from the pump and filters to the block so I connected the other port on the post fuel filter to the fuel line feeding the engine using AN6 connectors and a 1/2"NPT to AN6 adapters on the filter bases.
Make sure to secure your fuel line, you do not want something to snag it and destroy your work.
You will need to decide how you want to power your fuel pump, for now I have it powered by the fuel bowl heater, but I plan to get a oil pressure switch route.
The fuel/water separator I bought is pretty big and could be more easily damaged so when it is time for a filter change I will change it for a smaller one or hopefully figure out some better way so I can keep the Racor one.

Install fuel lines to engine.
I used AN6 connectors to all points on the engine other than where I could not remove the factory fitting on the rear driver side.
You will need a AN 6 Y splitter and connect one end to the fuel supply and the other 2 ports to the rear of the heads.  Be careful to make sure your hoses to not get to close to the exhaust.

You will want to flush the fuel through the heads before trying to start, I opened the FPR screw up so there was no fuel pressure and let the pump run about 10 minutes.
Then adjust your fuel pressure accordingly, I've read 60-75 is best but the engine can actually start and run as low as 15 I've found.  

If you want to watch the videos I have on performing a efuel conversion check out my YouTube videos at:

 
Step by step conversion PART 1

Step by step conversion PART 2

Overview of 1st conversion

Thoughts about fuel pumps
 


EFuel Conversion of 2000 F350

EFuel Conversion of 2000 F350 part 2


Other Thoughts.
Most frequent question I get asked is "is this worth it?"  Yes, any more OBS 7.3s I get that I intend to drive for awhile I will do this conversion on.
The other question I get is about reliability, and I believe it to improve reliability if you bother to install the fuel pressure gauge as well then you will always know if a no start is related to fuel delivery or not and my fuel system NEVER failed to fire up the 2 trucks I've done them on to date.
While you can go cheap on some things, it usually won't be quite worth it, first I used a cheap "bosch stle" fuel pump, it did last almost 2 years and probably sucked up some nasty fuel but at one point my truck was cutting out losing fuel pressure and I changed out the cheap pump for a Bosch .044 fuel pump before I was actually stranded. 
Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jeKA1J-u8Jk
I also read many used the NAPA filter base, so I went with one for the post side, mine dripped and I tried different brands of filters and yes I put oil on the seal of the filter but after paying the extra for the Diesel Site filter base I stopped dripping fuel.
The difference I think is if you look at a NAPA base vs a Strictly Diesel base they look just alike EXCEPT the threaded part that goes into the filter looks to be copper while the NAPA is not, either way this one never leaked for me.
I also wouldn't recommend Glow Shift Gauges after a year and a half the fuel pressure sensor was failing I think and was for sure leaking at the screw terminals, this would be real bad on a gasoline application.
 


CommentAdd Comment/Rating


Other Articles by this Author

Back
Set us as your default homepage Bookmark us Terms and Conditions  http://PatrickTheSalvageGuy.com/ Viewers: Members and Guests Page load time 0.063 seconds Go To Top Of Page

Sponsor Advertisment: